Method Acting

featheroftheowl:

Juvenile Boreal Owl by mattisj

featheroftheowl:

Juvenile Boreal Owl by mattisj

Reblog - Posted 1 hour ago - via / Source with 43 notes
tagged as → #animals #birds #owls #boreal owl #zoology

deaneggsandsam:

when u sneeze in front of your pet and they look like you’ve just offended their great ancestors

image

spaceplasma:

To Boldly Go Where No Man Has Gone Before

Whether and when NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft, humankind’s most distant object, broke through to interstellar space, the space between stars, has been a thorny issue. For the last year, claims have surfaced every few months that Voyager 1 has “left our solar system”.
Voyager 1 is exploring an even more unfamiliar place than our Earth’s sea floors — a place more than 11 billion miles (17 billion kilometers) away from our sun. It has been sending back so much unexpected data that the science team has been grappling with the question of how to explain all the information. None of the handful of models the Voyager team uses as blueprints have accounted for the observations about the transition between our heliosphere and the interstellar medium in detail. The team has known it might take months, or longer, to understand the data fully and draw their conclusions.
Since the 1960s, most scientists have defined our solar system as going out to the Oort Cloud, where the comets that swing by our sun on long timescales originate. That area is where the gravity of other stars begins to dominate that of the sun. It will take about 300 years for Voyager 1 to reach the inner edge of the Oort Cloud and possibly about 30,000 years to fly beyond it. Informally, of course, “solar system” typically means the planetary neighborhood around our sun. Because of this ambiguity, the Voyager team has lately favored talking about interstellar space, which is specifically the space between each star’s realm of plasma influence.
Voyager 1, which is working with a finite power supply, has enough electrical power to keep operating the fields and particles science instruments through at least 2020, which will mark 43 years of continual operation. At that point, mission managers will have to start turning off these instruments one by one to conserve power, with the last one turning off around 2025.
The spacecraft will continue sending engineering data for a few more years after the last science instrument is turned off, but after that it will be sailing on as a silent ambassador. In about 40,000 years, it will be closer to the star AC +79 3888 than our own sun. (AC +79 3888 is traveling toward us faster than we are traveling towards it, so while Alpha Centauri is the next closest star now, it won’t be in 40,000 years.) And for the rest of time, Voyager 1 will continue orbiting around the heart of the Milky Way galaxy, with our sun but a tiny point of light among many.

For more information about Voyager, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/voyager and http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov.

spaceplasma:

To Boldly Go Where No Man Has Gone Before

Whether and when NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft, humankind’s most distant object, broke through to interstellar space, the space between stars, has been a thorny issue. For the last year, claims have surfaced every few months that Voyager 1 has “left our solar system”.

Voyager 1 is exploring an even more unfamiliar place than our Earth’s sea floors — a place more than 11 billion miles (17 billion kilometers) away from our sun. It has been sending back so much unexpected data that the science team has been grappling with the question of how to explain all the information. None of the handful of models the Voyager team uses as blueprints have accounted for the observations about the transition between our heliosphere and the interstellar medium in detail. The team has known it might take months, or longer, to understand the data fully and draw their conclusions.

Since the 1960s, most scientists have defined our solar system as going out to the Oort Cloud, where the comets that swing by our sun on long timescales originate. That area is where the gravity of other stars begins to dominate that of the sun. It will take about 300 years for Voyager 1 to reach the inner edge of the Oort Cloud and possibly about 30,000 years to fly beyond it. Informally, of course, “solar system” typically means the planetary neighborhood around our sun. Because of this ambiguity, the Voyager team has lately favored talking about interstellar space, which is specifically the space between each star’s realm of plasma influence.

Voyager 1, which is working with a finite power supply, has enough electrical power to keep operating the fields and particles science instruments through at least 2020, which will mark 43 years of continual operation. At that point, mission managers will have to start turning off these instruments one by one to conserve power, with the last one turning off around 2025.

The spacecraft will continue sending engineering data for a few more years after the last science instrument is turned off, but after that it will be sailing on as a silent ambassador. In about 40,000 years, it will be closer to the star AC +79 3888 than our own sun. (AC +79 3888 is traveling toward us faster than we are traveling towards it, so while Alpha Centauri is the next closest star now, it won’t be in 40,000 years.) And for the rest of time, Voyager 1 will continue orbiting around the heart of the Milky Way galaxy, with our sun but a tiny point of light among many.

For more information about Voyager, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/voyager and http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov.

cross-connect:

Michael Vincent Manalo is a photographer and a digital mixed-media artist. His work is inspired by the imagined memories of nostalgic and dream-like environments; his works documents their decline into post-apocalyptic and nightmarish creations. 

uromancy:

Howard David Johnson. Valkyrie Maiden. 2010.

uromancy:

Howard David Johnson. Valkyrie Maiden. 2010.

Reblog - Posted 3 hours ago - via / Source with 27 notes
tagged as → #art #paintings
But if these years have taught me anything it is this: you can never run away. Not ever. The only way out is in."
— Junot Díaz (via likeafieldmouse)

striders:

every group of friends has a mom friend and if u dont have one then u are the mom friend

bucky-barnes-booty:

breelandwalker:

NORWEGIAN

FOREST

CATS

VIKING

KITTAHS

VIKING KITTAHS THAT’S PERFECT

(Source: megtroid)

sumiregusashadow:

morgandria:

Carved Quartz crow skull.

hnnnn GIVE

sumiregusashadow:

morgandria:

Carved Quartz crow skull.

hnnnn GIVE

(Source: skullis.com)

earthlynation:

Ameerega trivittata, Three Striped Poison Frog, Rio Palcazu River drainage, Departmento Pasco, Peru (by Brad Wilson, DVM)

earthlynation:

Ameerega trivittata, Three Striped Poison Frog, Rio Palcazu River drainage, Departmento Pasco, Peru (by Brad Wilson, DVM)

angelarizza:

I was having trouble deciding whether to go with red or blue for Deviant Art’s newest contest which has an Edgar Allan Poe theme. Thanks everyone for the comments, ended up submitting the blue one! They announce the semi finalist around August 1st.

Reblog - Posted 5 hours ago - via / Source with 558 notes
mythologicalevolution:

Hybridas Morte, Artifact from Lost Civilization of Agynius  for Mythological Evolution 
Obsidian, tormaline, smoky quartz, charcoal, resin

mythologicalevolution:

Hybridas Morte, Artifact from Lost Civilization of Agynius  for Mythological Evolution 

Obsidian, tormaline, smoky quartz, charcoal, resin

Reblog - Posted 5 hours ago - via / Source with 90 notes